Beauty products

What to know about “clean” skincare and beauty products

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Many skincare and beauty products are marketed as “clean.” But it’s a marketing label. It is better to read the ingredients on the back of the product rather than the marketing term on the front.

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“Clean” skincare and personal care products are all the rage right now, but what does it mean for a beauty product to be considered “clean”?

Unfortunately, there are many different definitions of “clean” in skincare, and it’s largely become a marketing term rather than a scientific one. Beauty retailers like Target, Walgreens, Ulta, and Sephora all have their own definitions of clean beauty, as does California’s Prop 65.

The problem is that “clean” often means several things combined, such as “eco-friendly”, “reef safe”, “cruelty-free” and “non-toxic” and is not regulated or defined by the FDA. Additionally, many “clean” products are also labeled as “vegan, organic” or “gluten-free.” This makes it difficult for consumers to make the best beauty and skin care choices.

How to Find the Best Clean Skin Care Products

So what can you do to sort marketing terms from meaningful scientific terms when choosing skincare products?

Don’t be fooled by the marketing terms on the front of the bottle. Turn the package over and read the ingredient list. If you’re unsure of a particular ingredient, you can use free online resources like the Environmental Working Group’s Cosmetic Ingredient Database to research them, or ask your skincare professional. You can also use tools like the “clean” filter on skintypesolutions.com when searching for products.

Stay up to date with the latest skin care news. Dermatologists and other skin care experts are working towards a consensus on what “clean” means.

Work with a board-certified dermatologist to get a personalized skincare regimen and product recommendations so you know the ingredients are safe and right for your skin.

At the end of the line

It’s unfortunate that terms like “clean, “non-toxic,” and “organic” are so confusing when it comes to skincare. We hope that ongoing research can help create a clearer definition of terms like this so that consumers have all the tools they need to make an informed skin care decision.

To stay up to date with the latest skincare news and science, follow Baumann Cosmetic on YouTube or @BaumannCosmetic on Instagram or Facebook.

LeslieBaumann
Dr. Leslie Baumann Miami